Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress

28 Nov

Part 2 of More than just eCoal, eSteam and ePower: The Modernizing Dynamics of Change

As is the norm, the Industrial Age’s inventions were driven by an intense economic hunger to build new approaches to harnessing fuel and momentum to bridge the gap between the large demand for resources, applications and new industries. A key economic consumer item was glass windows, given that in Europe from the 15th Century for two centuries there was a cooling period, which encouraged people to spend more time indoors. Although the catalyst for this new age was legislative (King James I proclaiming in 1615 that “no person or persons whatsoever shall melt, make, or cause to be melted any kinde forme, or fashion of Glasse or Glasses whatsoever with Timber or Wood” to preserve wood stocks for his navy), the breakthroughs were economic (such as the invention of Abraham Darby’s new dome shaped furnace to utilise coal and Thomas Savery’s Miner’s Friend to extract water from the mines through steam, valves and suction). The greats of invention followed, such as Thomas Newcomen, James Watt and William Murdoch accelerated further the mechanising potential of coal and stream. This was expanded upon with re-imagined applications of this potential through rail inventions by Richard Trevithick and William Hedley  William Henry, John Fitch, John Stevens, William Symington and Robert Fulton creating inventions for steam powered water craft.

For success in the Information Age organisations need to harness information systems data as if it is steam and similarly frame computer science infrastructure as if it is a pressured air container for flows, movement and production. On a macro level doing so not only provides automation for the most basic of functions but increasingly enabled faster, more complex and personalised activity for creating previously unimaginable tools, products and functions. On an organisational level this push highlights the importance of organisations either directly or indirectly associated with technology to take advantage of new opportunities. This is particularly so given that longterm success of an organisation is normally founded on the principle of creating as wide a distance between the cost of production and the revenue from sales of goods or products.

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More than just eCoal, eSteam and ePower: The Modernizing Dynamics of Change also includes:

  1. Introduction;
  2. Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress;
  3. Not Just Invention: Change Through The Desire to Innovate, Reimagine and Expand;
  4. New Tools, New Patterns, New Thoughts: the Great Dialogue;
  5. Nobody Will Notice The Slow Death of Dissmeination, They Will Be Too Busy Listening;
  6. The frictions of competition and cooperation to strategic thinking;
  7. The Hot and Cold Wars: Relationships and conflicts between big and small, propriety and open source.

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Other blog posts in the Order From Chaos miniseries include:

  1. Order From Chaos: Performance Management and Social Media Analytics in the Age of Big Data;
  2. Abstraction, Perspective and Complexity: Social Media’s Canon of Proportions;
  3. Logic, Computation and (f*(k?) Meming: On2logi+k,ing;
  4. Transposition, Catalysts and Synthesis: Playing with iMacwells eDemon.

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If you have any suggestions, relevant links or questions to add flavour to this series then please join the dialogue below or contact me via Twitter:

  1. social_informed, covering wiser social business themes;
  2. metr1c1de, covering benchmarking;
  3. secureitie, covering security;
  4. datam1n1ng, covering data and statistics;
  5. managechangeit, covering management, change and IT.
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9 Responses to “Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress”

  1. ismisetusa November 29, 2012 at 4:48 pm #

    Interesting blog,
    It leaves me wondering where you are heading with each of your blogs, how you plan on ‘building your castle’ as such or if your blogs are interlinked at all?

    I find your blogs intense, and no doubt extensive work has been dedicated, yet I see no evolution of ideas over the weeks.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. New Tools, New Patterns, New Thoughts: the Great Dialogue « So Opinionated … - November 28, 2012

    […] Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress […]

  2. Dialogue, Governance and Reform in the Web 2.0 Age: The Art of Noise « So Opinionated … - November 28, 2012

    […] Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress […]

  3. More than just eCoal, eSteam and ePower: The Modernizing Dynamics of Change « So Opinionated … - November 28, 2012

    […] ← Evaluating the risks of information system investments Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress → […]

  4. Not Just Invention: Change Through The Desire to Innovate, Reimagine and Expand « So Opinionated … - November 28, 2012

    […] ← Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress New Tools, New Patterns, New Thoughts: the Great Dialogue → […]

  5. Nobody Will Notice The Slow Death of Dissmeination, They Will Be Too Busy Listening « So Opinionated … - November 30, 2012

    […] Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress […]

  6. Abstraction, Perspective and Complexity: Social Media’s Canon of Proportions « So Opinionated … - February 11, 2013

    […] Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress […]

  7. Logic, Computation and (f*(k?) Meming: On2logi+k,ing « So Opinionated … - February 11, 2013

    […] Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress […]

  8. Order From Chaos: Performance Management and Social Media Analytics in the Age of Big Data « So Opinionated … - February 11, 2013

    […] Economic requirements: Catalyst for Invention, Innovation and Progress […]

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