IS Success

11 Jan

It is difficult to provide a single definition of what IS Success really is. Within the article “Quality Planning: A Conceptual Framework for Improving Information Systems Success,” Olayele Adelakun believes that success requires alterations in user education, organisational arrangements, or the leaving behind of IS altogether, (Adelakun, O.:1996). It is important to study the various literature associated with IS success as it will help to create an opinion on the most suitable framework used to support management teams in determining the success of their IS unit.

Within the article “Measuring information systems success models, dimensions, measures, and interrelationships,” Petter, S., DeLone, W. And McLean, E. describe how a model of IS success was developed. DeLone and McLean originally created a model of IS success in 1992. They performed a review of research published during 1981-1987 and developed a taxonomy of IS success. Within their paper they identified six different variables of IS success. These variables are information quality, use, user satisfaction, system quality, organisational impact, and individual impact, (Petter, S., DeLone, W. and McLean, E.:2008). The diagram below is the DeLone and McLean’s original model of IS success.

image013

(Petter, S., DeLone, W. and McLean, E.:2008).

However, after the publication of DeLone and McLean’s IS success model, many researchers recommended modifications to the model. For example Seddon & Kiew (1996) altered the construct, use, as they believed that if system use is compulsory, usefulness is better than use. It was also agreed by numerous researchers that service quality should be added to the IS success model. DeLone and McLean then updated the model in 2003. The updated version of the IS success model includes the service quality element. DeLone and McLean substituted the variables, individual impact and organisational impact with net benefits. A further explanation of the use element was added to the updated model. They believed that increased user satisfaction would result to increased intention to use, (Petter, S., DeLone, W. and McLean, E.:2008). The diagram below is the DeLone and McLean’s updated version of the IS success model.

1-s2_0-S0378720606000498-gr2

(Petter, S., DeLone, W. and McLean, E.:2008).

It is the most commonly used and most cited model in the IS literature. The model has been used to explain the IS success at the individual level of analysis. However on a few occasions this model has been used to measure success at the organisational level of analysis. (Perez-Mira, B.,:2010). This is an effective model for IS success. It is broadly used by IS researchers for comprehending and measuring the elements of IS success. This model is a useful framework for managing IS success measurements, (Petter,S., DeLone,W. and McLean, E.:2008).

What do others think? Do you believe that this is an effective model for IS success?

References:
[1] Source 1: Adelakun,O.(1996) “Quality Planning: A Conceptual Framework for Improving Information Systems Success.”

[2] Source 2: Petter,S., DeLone,W. & McLean,E. (2008) “Measuring information systems success: models dimensions, measures, and interrelationships.”

[3] Source 3: Perez-Mira, B. (2010) “Validity of DeLone and McLean’s model of information systems success at the web site level of Analysis.”

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3 Responses to “IS Success”

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