Archive by Author

IS Quality: Developing a framework to support management teams in determining the quality of their IS services and outputs

27 Apr

IS Quality

Developing a framework to support management teams in determining the quality of their IS services and outputs:

In my last post, I reviewed and discussed more about factors that cause the failure of Information Systems in organisations and how they can be avoided. I also talked about the success factors and how best to make them happen in order to achieve positive outputs that IS could offer to Firms and Organisations. However, in this post, I will further my review and discussions on Information Systems quality in relation , and with reference to business intelligence, also connecting with comments to some key points discussed in other blogs I have read. I will also include some of my findings from social media making News around the world.

Comments:

I keeping with team spirit, I would like to congratulate my Blog colleague with the author; davidoppermann who is also blogging on IS Quality, for the visual representations in his last blog entitled; (Fox or Hedgehog? A Guide to Developing a Framework for Decision Makers). Nevertheless, I will be quick to suggest that we should mix any chosen framework with some points to illustrate the likely positive results or outcome of such framework in relation to IS quality in organisations. In his analogies, he focused more, if not only, on the conceptual framework from Marc Clifton without telling us the exact or anticipated values IS could derive from such framework if implemented. This, I believe will help our team and even a granny to understand what we are talking about, thereby reducing much of brain storming for our readers. However, he did a good research.

Business Intelligence (BI) in relation to IS Quality:  

According to Solomon Negash (2004), in order to improve the timeliness and quality of inputs in decision process, Business intelligence systems therefore, combine operational data with analytical tools to present complex and competitive information to planners and decision makers. Negash in his own words defined Business Intelligence Systems as follows: “BI systems combine data gathering, data storage, and knowledge management with analytical tools to present complex internal and competitive information to planners and decision makers”. In furtherance to the above, Negash stressed that, business intelligence is a mirror-image with which firms’ capabilities in terms of; the-state-of-the-art, trends, future directions in the markets, the regulatory environment for competition, as well as competitors’ actions and the implications of their actions can be clearly understood.

From the above definition, we can understand that BI systems deliver actionable information at the right time, at the right location, and in the right form to help improve timeliness and quality of inputs to decision making process. According to Langseth and Vivatrat (2003), business intelligence can be view as proactive, and has the following components: real-time data warehousing, data mining, automated anomaly and exception detection, data visualisation, proactive alerting with automatic recipient determination, geographical information systems, etc.

Figure 1 below illustrates how BI uses various available information inputs to achieve the intelligence needed for decision making in organisation.

OLAP = On-Line Analytic Processing, DW = Data Warehousing, DM = Data Mining, EIS = Executive Information System, and ERP = Enterprise Requirement Planning.

Figure 1: Inputs to Business Intelligence Systems (Business Intelligence by S. Negash).

This article describes BI as a natural outgrowth of former systems designed to support in decision making process. Business intelligence became stronger and more relevant with the support of data warehousing as a repository, data cleansing, hardware and software, and the internet technologies with prevalent user interface. Business intelligence gathers information from various other systems to build its proactive capabilities as shown in figure 2 below.

OLAP = On-Line Data Processing, CRM = Customer relationship Management, DSS = Decision Support Systems, GIS = Geographic Information Systems.

Figure 2: Business Intelligence Relation to Other Information Systems (Business Intelligence by S. Negash).

To conclude, Business Intelligence converts data into information and, through human analysis, is converted into knowledge.

IS Quality Helping to Reduce Environmental Degradation

The important information systems play in our lives and environments cannot be over emphasised. It is my opinion that the quality of information system can only be measured by its outputs. Information Systems has continued to advance in so many ways, and in trying to change not only the way we do business, but also the way we live our live and how we conduct and protect our environment for the future generations yet unborn. The IS quality has greatly manifested itself in the campaign against environment pollution in the world’s most populous industrial region China. Information system is an embodiment of data, people, process, and IT artefacts. The latest technological breakthrough has come from the campaign against environmental pollution which has lead to the production of fresh clean air in a can in China.

Fresh Clean Air in a Can is being distributed freely on the streets of Beijing China by a Chinese Philanthropist Chen Guangbiao. The Philanthropist predicts that in the next ten years masks will be used in Beijing due to massive air pollution currently eating deep into the environment.

The fresh air is being harvested from the less polluted rural areas of China such as Tibetan and Shansi provinces. Each of the fresh canned air will cost about ¥45 or about US$7, but Chen Guangbiao has promised to donate 80c from each can sold back to the rural community.

Considering the amount of smog infiltrating the entire environment in Beijing, Mr. Guangbiao may be absolutely right in his ten years’ use of masks prediction. It has been reported, that nearly 50 percent of patients in the outpatients’ ward in a Beijing hospital, including children are currently suffering from respiratory related diseases. As at Tuesday 29 January, the reading from the air quality shows 400 in Beijing.  That is the index which measures particulate Matter in the air with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres, known as PM2.5. A level of 300 is considered to be dangerous, and the World Health Organisation recommends a daily level of no more than 20.

Should the authorities concerned not make serious efforts to bring this situation under control, it is no doubt that in no distance time, air will seriously become an essential commodity which the poor cannot afford to buy in China, and maybe, in due course, in some other countries too, and gradually so, the world will be drifting to, not only environmental degradation, but to what I may term “global environmental holocaust”.

Follow the link below and take a view on how fast the world is advancing in Information Technology (Source: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1DJdmU-XFs (“Canned Air” Hitting Beijing’s Smog-Filled Streets)).

References:

  1. Solomon Negash: Computer Science and Information Systems Department

Kennesaw State University; (Communication for the Association for Information systems (Volume 13, 2004) 177 – 195): http://site.xavier.edu/sena/info600/businessintelligence.pdf.

  1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1DJdmU-XFs. (“Canned Air” Hitting Beijing’s Smog-Filled Streets).

IS Quality and the Internet Revolution: The Arab Spring Uprising experience of 2011

10 Feb

The Arab Spring Uprising experience of 2011

Much has been talked about regarding Information System Quality, nonetheless, I would like to bring our attention to the role which Information System played in collaboration with computer aided Internet, and social networking in creating positive mobilisation for political and social change in the Arab world. I will support my view point with some relevant articles and the narratives from a scholarly publication in an international journal of communication (2011), bearing the title; “The Egyptian Experience: Sense and Nonsense of the Internet Revolution”, published by Miriyam Aouragh of Oxford University, and Anne Alexnder of University of Cambridge.

As part of Information System Quality; the Internet, Facebook, and other Social Media Network were used to disseminate information and mobilise the people in the Arab nations to rise against dictatorship government, operations, social injustice, and human rights abuse in the region. It all started with Tunisia in 2010 when the president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was forced to step down by angry protesters due to the fatal self-immolation by Mohamed Bouazizi a street vendor who was protesting his mistreatment by local officials. This protest in Tunisia motivated people in Egypt to take to the streets demanding political reform which in turn forced President Hosni Mubarak to resign his 30 years of dictatorship rule. In the same manner, the strongest and most stubborn leader Africa in history- Colonel Muammar Gaddafi of Libya was ousted and killed in October 2011. This Arab protest had a chain reaction and thereby, spread through to Morocco, Yemen, Iraq, Syria, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia respectively. http://www.thejournal.ie/in-pictures-the-arab-spring-uprisings-of-2011-310383-Dec2011/#slide-slideshow1

According to the writers, it is important to separate the use of Internet as a tool by people                                               seeking to achieve change from below, and the Internet’s role as a space to articulate collective dissent. They suggested three main points; the need to go beyond the debate between utopian and dystopian perspective regarding the role of Internet in political change, a change from perspectives that isolate Internet from other media by reviewing the synergy between social media and satellite broadcasters during the uprising, and also, to have an understanding of the dialectical relationship between online and offline political action.

They tend to agree with Morozov’s (2011) argument that, a government threatened with revolution would just pull the plug on the Internet, but that wouldn’t stop the protest either, and cannot prevent the protesters from communicating. The writers disagree with what they call false polarization of utopian/dystopian views of the Internet, rather they accept that  Internet is a product of imperialist and capitalist logics, and a thing that millions use in their efforts to resist those logics. They propose a dialectical relationship between online and offline political action. They finally supported their argument with a quote from Lenin that, “There are decades where nothing happens; and there are weeks where decades happen.”

Blog Egypt protest 2011

Egyptians celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military at Tahrir Square on 11 February. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra/PA Images)

To conclude on the above episode, I agree and disagree with some of the views expressed in the paper. I agree that Internet alone cannot mobilise people without the active presence of the activists and the folks who stormed the streets of Cairo Egypt. On the other hand, I disagree with the quote from Morozov (2011) as stated above. If any government pulls the plug of the Internet, they will automatically disable the flow of communication through the Internet, and that will create a huge impact in disrupting all plans towards action. It makes big news whenever America observes that Internet-Hackers have infiltrated their national or military classified documents through the Internet of course. Finally, I could recollect that during the revolution of 2011 in Egypt, it was reported that mobilisation of the folks to rise against the 30 years of dictatorship by Hosni Mubarak started with the Facebook. Egyptians responded to that call throughout the whole world, and the effect was disastrous to Mubarak and his allies.  The dismantle of Mubarak’s throne was a display of the good qualities Information systems can deliver.

Sources:

  1. http://www.thejournal.ie/in-pictures-the-arab-spring-uprisings-of-2011-310383-Dec2011/#slide-slideshow1
  1. AOURAGH, M. Oxford University; ALEXANDER, A. University of Cambridge: The Egyptian Experience: Sense and Nonsense of the Internet Revolution.

International Journal of Communication 5 (2011), Feature 1344-1358 1932–8036/2011FEA1344

IS Quality: IS Quality in Relation to Logistics and Supply Chain Management

9 Feb

In my last post I discussed Business Intelligence in relation to IS Quality, I also talked about the role of IS in checkmating environmental degradation. Now I will be examining quality assurance in relation to  information system quality in logistics and supply chain management.  Although ports’ facilities and services are the main link in international logistics, however, ports have created unnecessary bureaucracies in maritime transport.   Also, the provision of quality services have been compromised by the complex internal  organisation of the ports arising from large number of different groups that take part in goods transfer between internal and external transport vehicles. It is obvious that the quality and efficiency of ports’ services has impacted on both service providers, customers, port authorities, as well as the port hinterland by way of multiplier effect on the regional economy. For the forgoing, I suggest that certification of every service provider is a means to assure quality service to customers. Hence, the main aim of logistics supply chain management is to facilitate processes and transform service approach so as to satisfy consumer preferences efficiently and effectively.

It has been observed that these processes have been marked by а steady shift from historical use of open markets to new business co-ordination mechanisms between vertically related market stages, such as those between producers and processors, and between processors and distribution channels. Internationalization of firms and markets can only succeed with a high level of performance of all activities linked with transport, storage and distribution mechanisms. In international trade, cost of logistics is very important to agrifood industry.

Image

Figure 1: Logistics Ship in motion

 

Quality Assurance Guarantee

Quality of port services to end customer is essential attribute in logistics provision and must be guaranteed.

To ensure an agreed and satisfactory level of service provision, port customers must ensure that price and related attributes of goods must be clearly specified as written in contracts with the service providers. The problematic situation is that, all exporters and importers can only exchange official contracts with terrestrial or maritime transporting firms and customs agents. Any other such arrangements and measures can only be done through informal contracts. However, with the absence of а formal contract, logistics agreements are only covered by minimum standards whose formulation is so vague that “principal” who wishes to avail himself of such provisions is seen as breaking the rules and is likely to incur very high enforcement costs. This restriction allows importers and exporters minimum control of port logistics activities.

Beyond the control of all parties involved are contractual conditions of stevedores and consignees, and of public sector organizations which are often capricious and answerable only to state. Every other informal logistics contracts are covered by International Commerce Terms (Incoterms).

The purpose of these rules is to facilitate international transactions, increase transparency and define rights and responsibilities of contracting parties.

Problems Encountered

There are usually some problems with Co-ordination, Control and Asymmetric Information in port services due to some service providers and other heterogenic matters. Nevertheless, the perceived relationships between service providers and their customers – ship owners and exporters and importers of traded goods – tend to be both co-operative and competitive in form. Most corporate firms often decide to outsource their logistics to principal-agents and save themselves the troubles. If logistics is outsourced, then asymmetric information may be important, especially where transport involves both bulk and container goods over long distances of maritime transport. All-in-all, principal-agent selection may sometime lead to the adverse problem and moral hazard. This is due to the fact that under settings of quality uncertainty, market prices might generate insufficient returns for high quality service provision.

Quality Solutions

Supplier of goods or services should send signal to customer regarding characteristics of service or performance of agent, this also depends on prevailing circumstances, because signal of product quality may be that of price, reputation, guarantees, or even the promotional costs.

Also, certification by а third party or acceptance of minimum quality constraints or standards of licensing is considerable. This will help to confer approval in terms of ability, excellence and good organization, to create the required confidence to undertake transactions with third parties.

Conclusions

To improve the functionality of international logistics supply chain, high quality port services provision is needed, so that processes whereby goods are transported by sea will meet expectations of final consumers in terms of punctuality, quality, reliability and price. This can only be achieved by the use of optimum standards of coordination among service providers firms. Information system can simplify the entire process by making adiquate use of Database Management System (DBMS), and ensuring that every other application is in place.

 

References:

Safwan Al Salaimeh, Computer Science Department, Irbid National University; American Journal of Scientific Research, ISSN 1450-223X Issue 1(2009), pp. 34-36; http://www.eurojournals.com/ajsr.htm

IS Quality

8 Feb

Developing a framework to support management teams in determining the quality of their IS services and outputs:

In my last post, I reviewed and discussed more about factors that cause the failure of Information Systems in organisations and how they can be avoided. I also talked about the success factors and how best to make them happen in order to achieve positive outputs that IS could offer to Firms and Organisations. However, in this post, I will further my review and discussions on Information Systems quality in relation , and with reference to business intelligence, also connecting with comments to some key points discussed in other blogs I have read. I will also include some of my findings from social media making News around the world.

Comments:

I keeping with team spirit, I would like to congratulate my Blog colleague with the author; davidoppermann who is also blogging on IS Quality, for the visual representations in his last blog entitled; (Fox or Hedgehog? A Guide to Developing a Framework for Decision Makers). Nevertheless, I will be quick to suggest that we should mix any chosen framework with some points to illustrate the likely positive results or outcome of such framework in relation to IS quality in organisations. In his analogies, he focused more, if not only, on the conceptual framework from Marc Clifton without telling us the exact or anticipated values IS could derive from such framework if implemented. This, I believe will help our team and even a granny to understand what we are talking about, thereby reducing much of brain storming for our readers. However, he did a good research.

Business Intelligence (BI) in relation to IS Quality:  

According to Solomon Negash (2004), in order to improve the timeliness and quality of inputs in decision process, Business intelligence systems therefore, combine operational data with analytical tools to present complex and competitive information to planners and decision makers. Negash in his own words defined Business Intelligence Systems as follows: “BI systems combine data gathering, data storage, and knowledge management with analytical tools to present complex internal and competitive information to planners and decision makers”. In furtherance to the above, Negash stressed that, business intelligence is a mirror-image with which firms’ capabilities in terms of; the-state-of-the-art, trends, future directions in the markets, the regulatory environment for competition, as well as competitors’ actions and the implications of their actions can be clearly understood.

From the above definition, we can understand that BI systems deliver actionable information at the right time, at the right location, and in the right form to help improve timeliness and quality of inputs to decision making process. According to Langseth and Vivatrat (2003), business intelligence can be view as proactive, and has the following components: real-time data warehousing, data mining, automated anomaly and exception detection, data visualisation, proactive alerting with automatic recipient determination, geographical information systems, etc.

Figure 1 below illustrates how BI uses various available information inputs to achieve the intelligence needed for decision making in organisation.

Image

 OLAP = On-Line Analytic Processing, DW = Data Warehousing, DM = Data Mining, EIS = Executive Information System, and ERP = Enterprise Requirement Planning.

Figure 1: Inputs to Business Intelligence Systems (Business Intelligence by S. Negash).

 

This article describes BI as a natural outgrowth of former systems designed to support in decision making process. Business intelligence became stronger and more relevant with the support of data warehousing as a repository, data cleansing, hardware and software, and the internet technologies with prevalent user interface. Business intelligence gathers information from various other systems to build its proactive capabilities as shown in figure 2 below.

Image

OLAP = On-Line Data Processing, CRM = Customer relationship Management, DSS = Decision Support Systems, GIS = Geographic Information Systems.

Figure 2: Business Intelligence Relation to Other Information Systems (Business Intelligence by S. Negash).

 

To conclude, Business Intelligence converts data into information and, through human analysis, is converted into knowledge.

 

IS Quality Helping to Reduce Environmental Degradation

The important information systems play in our lives and environments cannot be over emphasised. It is my opinion that the quality of information system can only be measured by its outputs. Information Systems has continued to advance in so many ways, and in trying to change not only the way we do business, but also the way we live our live and how we conduct and protect our environment for the future generations yet unborn. The IS quality has greatly manifested itself in the campaign against environment pollution in the world’s most populous industrial region China. Information system is an embodiment of data, people, process, and IT artefacts. The latest technological breakthrough has come from the campaign against environmental pollution which has lead to the production of fresh clean air in a can in China.

Fresh Clean Air in a Can is being distributed freely on the streets of Beijing China by a Chinese Philanthropist Chen Guangbiao. The Philanthropist predicts that in the next ten years masks will be used in Beijing due to massive air pollution currently eating deep into the environment.

The fresh air is being harvested from the less polluted rural areas of China such as Tibetan and Shansi provinces. Each of the fresh canned air will cost about ¥45 or about US$7, but Chen Guangbiao has promised to donate 80c from each can sold back to the rural community.

 Considering the amount of smog infiltrating the entire environment in Beijing, Mr. Guangbiao may be absolutely right in his ten years’ use of masks prediction. It has been reported, that nearly 50 percent of patients in the outpatients’ ward in a Beijing hospital, including children are currently suffering from respiratory related diseases. As at Tuesday 29 January, the reading from the air quality shows 400 in Beijing.  That is the index which measures particulate Matter in the air with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres, known as PM2.5. A level of 300 is considered to be dangerous, and the World Health Organisation recommends a daily level of no more than 20.

Should the authorities concerned not make serious efforts to bring this situation under control, it is no doubt that in no distance time, air will seriously become an essential commodity which the poor cannot afford to buy in China, and maybe, in due course, in some other countries too, and gradually so, the world will be drifting to, not only environmental degradation, but to what I may term “global environmental holocaust”.  

Follow the link below and take a view on how fast the world is advancing in Information Technology (Source: – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1DJdmU-XFs (“Canned Air” Hitting Beijing’s Smog-Filled Streets)).

 

  References:

  1. Solomon Negash: Computer Science and Information Systems Department

Kennesaw State University; (Communication for the Association for Information systems (Volume 13, 2004) 177 – 195): http://site.xavier.edu/sena/info600/businessintelligence.pdf.

  1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1DJdmU-XFs. (“Canned Air” Hitting Beijing’s Smog-Filled Streets).

IS Quality

6 Feb

Information Systems (IS) Quality
Information System at work!

Information Systems (ISs) Quality cannot be discussed in isolation of the factors that lead to the failures of Information Systems (ISs) in Organisations. However, common sense tells us that for a medical doctor (medical practitioner) to prescribe possible remedies or cure for an ailment or disease, the fundamental procedure is to first of all conduct (carry out) a medical diagnostic procedure (analysis of the problem) of the said ailment or disease in order to form a judgement for the right prescription. Using the same approach, we can now identify or prove the Information Systems’ (ISs) Quality by first, identifying the factors orchestrating the Information Systems failures in Organisations and Firms, and various ways to prevent them from occurring. I therefore, have to draw from my observations on the video production published in the YouTube website by Dr. G. Harin Dranath (18-02-2010). Dr. Harin Dranath is a Senior Lecturer in Management Information Systems, and the Director of Programmes for External Students studying MBA at Hong Kong University (HKU) SPACE Royal Holloway, University of London.
Although, I have made, analysed, and concluded these observations since last Wednesday 30th January 2013 but not published yet, I recognise my colleague ronnoc90 blogging on IS Success, for sharing a similar view with me by publishing the same video on his blog site. Notwithstanding this earlier publication, I would like to further express my observations from the video while narrating my personal view points on the subject matter.
Information Systems (ISs) is usually faced with numerous challenges in every organisation where it is being implemented, in most cases, management fail to identify or recognise the many benefits (outputs) derived from implementing IS in their organisation, rather, they focus more on the Firms’ resources inputs in IS implementation. According to Dr. Harin Dranath (18-02-2010), Information Systems fail for the following reasons; problems associated with the system design, absence of data integrity, user related issues, cost concerns, operational problems, and above all, poor fit to the organisational processes or structures. He further stated that there are more fundamental issues militating against IS success in organisations. In his opinion, for business value, Firms need to implement IT that is business facing. Also, Firms need to keep negotiating faith with their business goals, hence, what matters most is how Firms conceptualise their Information System as a tool to achieve efficiency or effectiveness. He believed that with incremental innovation, and business model which is capable of exploiting technology for business impact, Information System can aid Firms to achieve a strategic differentiation. To achieve effectiveness, we need to see Information System as more than Information Technology.
He concluded by saying that, IT matters, but people, management, and innovative business management matter more. However, IS can succeed if we put people, user, and process at middle of decision-making, we must also think of IS as social systems in which people interact constantly with technology.
From my analysis of Dr. G. Harin Dranath’s point of view, I am of the opinion that, with the use of “gut instinct combined with intuitive decision-making”, also by putting people, user, IT artefacts, and process in the course of implementing Information System in an Organisation, IS value will be positively realised. Above all, to achieve Information Systems’ positive value and success, accuracy of data must be guaranteed for analytical purposes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqukM8cfo7M

Feel free to make comments!

What is Information System?

30 Nov

Thanks to all who have taken part in our social networking. The topic on “Information Systems” has being very informative and rich in academic materials. Ideas have being exchanged and new knowledge acquired. For me, the whole exercise has broadened my previous narrow experience social media forum. I now clearly understand the difference between Information System and Information Technology and their relationship, and also their individual and collective roles in companies and organisations in terms of achieving comparative advantage. Information system has changed the way companies and organisations do business. Information system has proved the world a “global communication village”, hence companies, organisations, and individuals can nowadays transact businesses all over the world without physical contact. What will this method of result to?
1. Cost saving
2. Time saving
3. Minimise both air, road, and rail accidents etc.
4. Gain comparative advantage
5. Realise business strategy,
And many more.

This programme is very encouraging and should be repeated.

Good luck to every blog member!

Why are Information Systems so important to the success of organisations? When can an Information System deliver (sustained) competitive advantage to organisations?

30 Nov

As I want to wrap up this period of blogging, I would like to use that opportunity to thank the organiser of this forum, he/she is a think-tank, and an epitome of wisdom. I equally share my respect with those students who during this blogging exercise remained focused, very careful with their choice of words, such that nothing offensive was observed by me from all the blogs I have read so far, congratulations. Contributions are not educating, but also full of humour and fun indeed. Cheers to you guys!
I agree with the opinion of Turban et al, (2006), in which he stated, that strategic information system is characterised by its ability to significantly change the way in which companies and organisations conduct their business. This blog will explain in detail, how information system can help organisations achieve competitive advantage. According to Michael Porter (1980), information systems exist to help organisations achieve their goals and objectives, and organisation’s goals and objectives are determined by its competitive strategy which in turn determines the structure, features, and functions of information systems. Nevertheless, organisations tend to examine their industry structure in order to determine a competitive strategy, and that strategy determines value chain, and the value chain in turn determines the business process. Finally, the form of business processes determines the structure of an information system. http://www.prenhall.com/behindthebook/0132337770/pdf/Kroenk_Chapter%203%20Combined.pdf

In strategic information systems, are embedded, the following features; decision support system, enterprise resource planning, database systems, and the real-time information systems which intend to sustain a rapid-response and quality indicators.

In the recent time, companies and organisations are beginning to recognise the external use of information systems as competitive weapons. The above assumption can be attributed to factors such as; decline in the cost of supporting ITs, structural changes in the economy due to global competition, and finally, the deregulation of some industry sectors such as, transportation and financial services.

In particular, “customer resource life cycle” is a model that best explain the use of information systems technology in competitive strategy. The customer resource life cycle model considers the relationship between a firm and its customers and how such change can be improved through strategic application of information system technologies. (Blake Ives and Gerald P. Learmonth, 1984).

Feel free to give your comments.

Why are Information Systems so important to the success of organisations? When can an Information System deliver (sustained) competitive advantage to organisations?

30 Nov

I would like to congratulate the rest of us that have taken part in this interactive social media. How I wish this forum will continue to be active even at the end of our ISBP programme, I believe we shall then make use of the forum more than the Facebook and Twitter.

Information systems are so important to the success of organisations, particularly, in delivering sustainable competitive advantage. In recent time, information systems have dramatically changed the way companies and organisations do business, it’s no more business as usual approach. This blog after reading it will convince all my audience to accept the fact that, without information systems, management of companies and organisations can hardly achieve a healthy and sustained competitive advantage.

Due to advancement in information provision, companies and organisations have likewise, furthered their development of information system and information technology strategies that relate to their business strategies, and which can equally support their corporate missions (Rogerson et al., 1994). There are however, three main information systems developed for general use, those are; financial systems, strategic systems, and operational systems. As top company’s management careless about the relationship between information system functions and corporate strategy, there arose problems in achieving strategies. According to Holsapple et al., (2000), modern companies and organisations nowadays are becoming knowledge-based enterprises with proactive knowledge management needed for competitive advantage.

Knowledge management has proved a major factor in competitive environment; as a result, companies must concentrate on their information system in order to achieve competitive advantage. Management of organisations need information system in place for both business operations and financial and non-financial aspects, such as decision making, to perform their management role effectively.

Leave your comments lads!

When can an Information System deliver (sustained) competitive advantage to organisations?

29 Nov

We in our group, and in fact, across the entire blogging spectrum, have undoubtedly, collectively discussed among other topics, the various aspects of information system, ranging from its definitions, to why it is important to the success of organisations, and finally, we are here to unravel, when it can deliver (sustained) competitive advantage to organisations. Good stuff! This is a laudable exercise, and remarkable experience to me, participating actively for the first time, in such a strong group of an academic cum social media, as an interactive forum. It has not only improved my research capabilities and knowhow, but also exposed me to knowing how objective people could view, or rather express their individual opinions on a singular topic.

Information system, defined as process, people and technology, has thrown a greater challenge to companies and organisations seeking to compete in the contemporary business environment. http://www.facultyjournal.com/webmaster/upload/__Paper4.pdf

I thank ah88rockybay and agblogail for their efforts to highlight more on the competitive advantages organisations derive from information systems. However, I will continue from where they stopped, and further highlight some among the numerous tangible and intangible benefits that give competitive advantage to organisations through information systems.

According to Bakos J. Y. et al (1998), opportunities from IT can be analysed from the perspective of organisation trying to improve efficiency and effectiveness on the current status. It can also, be analysed as a firm’s inner-person striving to out-manoeuvre other participants in a competitive rivalry. And finally, it could be analysed as an outsider investigating entry to an industry.
Further to the above declaration, Rockart and Scott Morton (1984) identified that three main opportunities that are capable of creating competitive advantage are; improve each value adding function, connect with customers and suppliers in order to increase their switching costs, and finally, create new business approach by way of services or products.
http://www.facultyjournal.com/webmaster/upload/__Paper4.pdf

Information system helps to reduce redundancy and obsoleteness in organisations. It enables organisations adequate and efficient stock and inventory management.
Give your comments!

Why are Information Systems so important to the success of organisations?

10 Nov

Thanks to you guys in my team for making great contributions so far regarding the meaning of Information Systems, and its importance to the success of organisations. Every contributor in both “intra and extra-blogging” groups (within and outside our blogging group), has made, among the series published so far, one vital point or another. However, there is still a “Gap” which I find very necessary to incorporate or bring into focus.

In a certain tribe in an African enclave (an ethnic community, if you like), if a hunter returns home successively from hunting without any wild, he will be asked by his kinsmen, to consult with the “oracle priest” for explanation on how best he could correct the anomalies. In that vein, I went and consulted with the Google to explain to me, what I was doing wrong in my blogging. I now came to the conclusion that in blogging, the most viable instrument to draw the attention and win the heart of your audience is “Creativity”, the ability to come up with new ideas, it could be abstract or pragmatic in nature. You can equally apply info-graphics, graphs, charts, analysis, interviews, and videos. Mix long and short posts, and remember to keep your audience informed, educated, and supplied with ample content. http://www.business2community.com/blogging/the-importance-of-blogging-for-your-small-business-0282539

The gap I identified in the entire blogging series, is the greater focus and attention paid to academic and professional journals, as well as popular authors. As a result, I have decided to digress a little bit and take you to a new direction, and thereby draw people’s attention to the reality on ground. We must not shy away from the fact that what we are talking about is social media and networks, and how they impact on firms, organisations, and individuals alike.

The crocks of the matter here is; why are information systems so important in the success of organisations?

To answer this question, I would like to use the recently concluded US presidential election process and, “the role of social media and networks in the 2012 US presidential election” as a good example of success factors of information systems in organisations.

It is a common knowledge, that, both President Barak Obama and Governor Mitt Romney extensively used the internet, facebook, twitter, and blog in reaching out to the American people, for not only their votes, but for the fund raising campaigns as well.

According to a research carried out by “Pew research”, 22% of Americans stated obviously who they will be voting for in this year’s election, via Twitter and Facebook. Also, 30% of the voters used social media platforms to encourage their friends and family to cast their vote on 6th November. Many of the voters casted their votes through Twitter and Facebook platforms. http://www.france24.com/en/20121107-2012-11-07-1319-wb-en-webnews

Let’s take a look on the graph below which shows the demographic representations of how voters made use of the social media during the 2012 US presidential election campaign.

http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Social-Vote-2012/Key-Findings/Social-Media-and-Voting.aspx

The Process of the election was a clear evidence of information systems at work. Through the voter’s database, all votes cast were analysed and directly communicated to the various media organisations, such as CNN, BBC, etc. The media organisations in turn broadcast the results to the public immediately.

What this means is that, the election results does not need to be transported on road, rail, or by air, and no delays or time wasting. The success achieved was high security guarantee, huge cost saving, accuracy of information guaranteed, etc.

The above processes involved in this highly contested election and the follow up results portray the benefits and successes information systems can bring to organisations.

Before we go to the next stage, feel free to give your comments on the above.

%d bloggers like this: